Transportation

Scientists know what OKI does not: It’s high time we invest more in public transit and other green transportation choices.

STOP the Eastern Corridor Highway.

START saving the planet!

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/cars-will-cook-the-planet-absent-shift-to-public-transportation/

Region’s Transportation Funding

Disproportionality Favors Cars Over All Other

Modes

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Research continues to show that Americans are driving less, but are biking, walking and using transit more. This is true in Cincinnati to the extent that transit ridership has increased in recent years.

While originally attributed to the economic downturn at the beginning of the century, these trends have continued while the economy has rebounded – leading many to believe it is an indication of new market forces being driven by aging Baby Boomers and emerging Millennials. Perhaps predictably so, governments have been slow to change with the changing economic forces.

Read more

Newtown pans “new SR 32 route”

Posted on July 17th, 2014

Eastern Corridor Newtown letter to TID 7-14-2014

Newtown sent the following to the Hamilton County Transportation Improvement District on July 14, 2014

We have been given a copy of a proposed new route for the S.R.32 relocation/Eastern Corridor project through the Village of Newtown that, we are told, was submitted to the TID by Bob Slattery. In addition to all of the problems encompassed with this new routing, we find it interesting that the plan has a major intersection at the Wag’s Dog Park location in the Village of Newtown, that property being controlled by Mr. Slattery.

As the Mayor of the Village and Chairperson of the Newtown Community Partner Committee, we are writing to insure that the TID is aware that the Village remains steadfastly opposed to any further development of this project. We do not see where this new alignment provides any better benefit to the Village of Newtown than any of the past plans presented to us. Not only does it continue to threaten the businesses and quality of life of our Village residents, this particular version appears to cross the Little Miami River in a particularly sensitive area due to a low suitability for a river crossing, floodplain, and archeological issues. The prospect of this project going forward is devastating to the Village and to its businesses and residents. We wish to assure the TID that any proposal submitted by private parties does not represent the position of the Village nor the Community Partner Committee, nor do we believe it represents the position of the business community in the Village. The proposed project in any alignment is a detriment to the Village and we continue in our opposition to it.

Respectfully,

Curt Cosby,Mayor

Mark Kobasuk, Chairperson Newtown Community Partner Committee

Read Sunday’s Cincinnati Enquirer letter to the editor on the Eastern Corridor.

Why build new highways and bridges when we can’t find the money to fix what we have (Brent Spence, Western Hills Viaduct) and our SORTA/Metro system lags behind cities of comparable size in their capacity to meet transit needs?

 

Job Opening

Posted on June 6th, 2014

Conservation Program Coordinator

One year, Part-Time/20 hours per week with benefits, Cincinnati, Ohio

The Sierra Club, the nation’s oldest, largest, and most influential grassroots environmental organization, is seeking a dedicated, and skilled individual who can take initiative to fulfill the role of Conservation Program Coordinator for the Ohio Chapter’s Miami Group.

This job includes engaging and educating community members around restoring and protecting our rivers and promoting sustainable transportation.  Responsibilities include organizing water monitoring, awareness events, community organizing and service outings, updating websites and recruiting volunteers. Read More

“”We don’t need it,” Newtown Mayor Curt Cosby told reporter Jason Williams. “The state keeps saying, ‘Well, we hear you and we’re taking that into account.’ But they continue to move forward and spend money. They don’t really hear us.”

Read the full editorial here.